The Only Good Thing About Rabbits

I’m like Elmer Fudd. I don’t like rabbits, and I’ll do just about anything to keep them out of my flowerbeds.

If you’re a gardener, you know that rabbits dig under fences, and organic repellants do nothing but keep people out of gardens. (Those things stink!) Chicken wire around flowerbeds looks awful, and willful rabbits chew right through it. I suppose that I could be like Elmer and get a shotgun and . . . But then I would feel SO guilty.

Elmer: [after shooting a rabbit Bugs made out of snow] Good heavens! He disintegwated.

[Bugs comes down as the “angel” of the snow rabbit]

Bugs: Eh, what’s up, doc? How are things down here on Earth?

Elmer: I’m sowwy, Mr. Wabbit. I hope I didn’t hurt you too much when I killed you.

Duck! Rabbit, Duck!—1953

Last spring, I ordered a clematis vine, a new variety with flowers the color of Patrick Dempsey’s eyes. I planted it, and I protected it in every way I knew how to keep those wabbits away. I was obsessed watching for those “things with ears” (That’s what I call ‘em.) and keeping them out of my garden.

Elmer Fudd: It’s wabbit season, and I’m hunting wabbits, so be vewy, vewy quiet!

Bugs Bunny’s Bustin’ Out All Over — 1980

And I was successful!

Somehow, some way, my clematis vine grew. And the vine made giant buds. And then, one day, those buds opened up into the most beautiful, McDreamy–ist, blue flowers, and I fell in love all over again with Dr. Derrick Shepherd (“Grey’s Anatomy” fans know what I mean.) And then—

You guessed it. While I slept, like a thief in the night, a rabbit burrowed under the fence. It endured the stinky rabbit repellant, gnawed through the chicken wire, and it ate . . . and ate . . . and ate.

And in the morning, I found one, perfect McDreamy flower lying on the ground. (If rabbits had thumbs, this rabbit would be thumbing its nose at me.)

Bugs: Oh, well. We almost had a romantic ending.

Mississippi Hare–1949

I don’t like rabbits! But there’s one thing that I admire about them— their tenacity.

The prophet Isaiah wrote:
My soul yearns for you in the night,
in the morning my spirit longs for you.

–Isaiah 26:9 NIV

Rabbits are like that. Their souls yearn for what they know is good for them and they stop at nothing to get it,

the way that we should be in our desire for God.

So, this spring when I plant my garden, I will remember that rabbits remind me to seek the Lord with all of my heart, soul, and strength, and then maybe . . . just maybe . . . I won’t be so upset when they eat my beautiful clematis vine—

The one with flowers the color of Patrick Dempsey’s eyes.

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jan2015FB

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Which Came First, The Chicken Or The Egg?

[I hope you’ll enjoy reading this post from Easter 2010.
I wish all of you, my readers, a very blessed, safe and happy holiday.]
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At Easter time, store shelves are stocked with cute little chicks and colorful plastic eggs holding hidden treasures. At Easter time, chickens become like rock stars.

Chickens are everywhere—even in the Bible!
Think about it:

  • Jonah “chickened out” when God wanted him to go to Nineveh,
  • Gideon was “chicken-hearted,” until God showed him his potential,
  • Sarah and Elizabeth were “no spring chickens” when they became pregnant,
  • the foolish man’s “chickens came home to roost” after he built his house on sand,
  • Martha ran around “like a chicken with her head cut off” cleaning and cooking for Jesus instead of spending quality time with Him,
  • the poor widow put “chicken feed” into the temple treasury . . .

Okay, obviously we’re talking about idioms—
expressions with non-literal meanings.

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? is the best known chicken idiom and a question that humans have pondered for years. Evolutionists believe that the egg came first. An egg from a non-chicken mutated into an egg that produced a barnyard chicken.

On the other hand, Christians believe that the chicken came first.
Proof is in Genesis 1:20-22.

And God said, “Let the water teem with living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the vault of the sky.” So God created the great creatures of the sea and every living thing with which the water teems and that moves about in it, according to their kinds, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. God blessed them and said, “Be fruitful and increase in number and fill the water in the seas, and let the birds increase on the earth.” (NIV)

Although we know better, we Christians sometimes behave like evolutionists. We put the egg before the chicken, similar to children eager to discover what treasures are hidden in plastic Easter eggs. We think more about God’s gifts than the One who put them there.

This Easter, I encourage you to consider not only God’s gift of salvation through Christ Jesus, but also the character of God Himself. Without His greatness, forgiveness, mercy, and love, there would be no Jesus, no Resurrection Sunday, and no promise of eternal life. There would be no good reason for cute stuffed chicks, plastic eggs, the Easter Bunny—or to ponder that silly question:

Which came first, the chicken or the egg?

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Are you on Facebook? Check out my page where I post daily articles and inspiration for writers. And while you’re there, I’d appreciate it if you’ll click on the “like” button near the top of the page. Thanks!

jan2015FB

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*NOTE: Any ads appearing in this post were not put there by me nor do I endorse them. WordPress sometimes posts ads in exchange for hosting this free blog.

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Filed under Easter, Which came first